Overcoming Fear: Guest Post by, Robert Quinn

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Fear.

It is a prison for many of us.

As a sufferer of social anxiety, I have lived with fear of social interactions for over 20 years. It began when I was in college. I had a difficult time standing in line at the checkout counter. For doing so, especially in a long line, gave me the feeling that others were looking at me.  Or, as any anxiety suffers can relate that “their eyes were on the back of my head”. In extreme instances, tremors in the limbs can occur.

You can imagine that life would be challenging if facing such a mundane task created such difficulties. In fact, we begin to do things to make ourselves comfortable. I would wear a hat. Sometimes, due to our anxiety we may act unusual. And then, a most terrible thing will happen – we are negatively reinforced and do not want to perform that social action again.

For many years, I did not go to church. Not because I did not want to. My anxiety of the people kept me partially away. But truth is known as a Catholic, my greatest fear was to go up and receive communion. I stayed in the pew many years even after returning.

I think that I have been ruled by my fear long enough. But I know that out there will be someone just as I was, trapped by this problem. To those, I say face your fear. Don’t let it hold you back. You are important.

I have begun to control my fear. I go to church and can receive communion. I can stand on line at the store with no hestiation. And recently, as this battle has heated up with PARCC and Common Core I have started to face perhaps my ultimate fear – public speaking. On 1/29/15, I gave a speech at the Jackson Township high school. I am very proud of what I wrote, because I feel that one of us finally needed to say it. And certainly it felt good to stand up to bullies.

I haven’t fully conquered my fear. Perhaps someday I will, but for now it’s more akin to putting down a revolt. Don’t let your fear control your life. You can do great things if you face your fear. And those of us who support you don’t think any less of you if you get up and stumble in your process of facing your fear. What you cannot allow to happen is for it to control you.

My good friend, who helped me get through my anxiety to speak the night of the speech, whispered in my ear “You sound like a politician!” Well, I’m no politician. To be truthful, I’m not sure if we human beings want someone of integrity to run for office anymore. What good candidate would subject their family to it? But I will say that I did thoroughly enjoy getting up to give the speech. Perhaps I will do it again.  If I can do this, what can you do? You’d be surprised.

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Here is the text of Robert Quinn’s testimony delivered on January 29, 2015 to the Study Commission on the Use of Assessments in NJ, headed by Education Commissioner David Hespe.

Thank you for inviting us here tonight to listen to our feedback regarding Assessment standards in New Jersey.   As a father of two, I am representative of the end results of these standards every night I help my children with their homework.

Recently, as Common Core has been in its implementation, I noted a change in my children’s education – for the worse. In many instances, the math is over complicated. The lessons try to teach the child what’s “behind” borrowing and lessons are rushed in an effort to pace them to the test. These practicalities are not only wasteful; they are confusing to the child and discouraging to their learning.

One big concern I have, beyond my own children, is how Common Core is affecting our most vulnerable children. We have heard some of our Districts in New Jersey called failing, but the reality is that the State of New Jersey is failing them. And they have been failing them for decades. This is the standard that our government has allowed to become acceptable. The rapid and fundamental changes involved in Common Core leave this segment of our population only further behind. This is an injustice to these young children, who have so much potential.  And perhaps that is the one goal of the standards and testing system.  Those in power are interested in keeping this segment of our population where they are. The key to move out of poverty is encouraging the love of education, which is the opposite of Common Core & PARCC..

We note that the PARCC standards seem to assume that everyone should go to college. And while college is a good aspiration in life, there are other worthy pathways in life beyond that of college that these standards do not account for.  And we look to our recent college graduates and wonder – will they have a job?  Perhaps one of my problems with these standards is that they treat the non-college requiring pathways as if they are menial. When in reality, these are the most stable and productive jobs in our present economy. Hard work and discipline is to be commended no matter the pathway.

Some have said, “Give PARCC a chance”. We parents hear “Let me use this experimental test on your child during their most productive learning years”. Parents have grave concerns related to how Common Core was implemented: Acceptance of Standards before they were developed/Million dollar deals with Book companies/Testing companies/Data Collection companies, Lack of input from New Jersey’s teachers, lack of input from parents. We notice that some of the same advocates for PARCC testing and Common Core in our government do not send their own child to schools where it is required. Why don’t they stand for what they claim to believe in?

While the focus for advocates of Common Core and PARCC has been standards, there are no statewide standards for refusing the test. In fact, there have been mixed reactions and communications to parents throughout the state. Some of the communications stated that the parent could not refuse the test. We as parents have rights to direct the education of our children and not the government.

To those in our government who would dare to say a voice such as mine is standing in the way of progress, we would certainly ask… the children’s progress or yours? We are standing right where we belong, between our children and those that would steamroll their future.

Thank you.

2 thoughts on “Overcoming Fear: Guest Post by, Robert Quinn

  1. India Mariconda says:

    Paige, thank you for posting this! Mr. Quinn, yours was one of my favorite testimonies. I also struggle with the reasoning behind the way they teach math. It takes simple concepts and complicates them. Thank you both for speaking out!!!

    Like

  2. Angela says:

    Thank you for addressing this issue. This is very articulate and I concur! I shake in those types of situations and I need to address my local school board. Your encouragement will help me do so! Thank you!

    Like

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