No….WE Raise NJ

The new coalition called We Raise NJ, headed by the NJPTA, was formed to add a different voice to the debate around the upcoming PARCC test in NJ. But really it is too little, too late.

Acting Commissioner of Education David Hespe, said back in October that there was no opt out movement. Maybe back in October there wasn’t, but the movement has been gaining steam ever since. The biggest obstacle has been ignorance. How can you warn parents who are largely unaware of the new education reforms and their impact on their children? How can you get them to pay attention, get educated, and rise to a call to action?

Well, it wasn’t a propaganda campaign of misinformation that did it or a small group of loud parents as the incoming NJ PTA president suggested in an article for NJ Spotlight.

“Her successor, incoming NJPTA president Rose Acerra, added: “There is a small group of parents making noise, but I think there are more who are looking up to us to give them information.”

More and more parents became involved because they are seeing the effects of the PARCC test first-hand. Their children are coming home with typing homework. Their children are being school budgets are being spent on technology upgrades to support this test. Their children are being test prepped to death with worksheets and pep talks. Their children’s teacher’s are stressed and that stress easily trickles down.

Acerra is wrong to suggest that it is just a “small group of parents making noise”, because more than half of the states originally slated to take the PARCC test have now declined to use it. When whole states are saying no to the PARCC, the opposition cannot be downplayed to just a few rabble-rousers. No one needs the NJPTA to give them information, because, though they help support essential school programs, they do not deal directly with educating students.

Parents need to hear from administrators who feel comfortable to speak candidly. Superintendent Michael Hynes from Long Island published an OP-Ed piece about the dangerous direction of data-obsessed, mandate-laden education reform.

Parents need to hear from experts in the education field about what exactly is developmentally appropriate for their children. Parents need to hear from teachers who are not afraid to lose their jobs, like those threatened recently in Philadelphia to not speak with parents of their students about testing concerns. Parents need to talk to their pediatricians about the AAP’s recommendations to limit screen time and the impacts of early and extensive use of electronic devices.

“We’re cautiously optimistic with the test, but we’re watching it like everyone else,” said Tyrrell, who lives in Neptune Township. “Unfortunately, we don’t know all the answers until after we give the test,” she said. “I think a lot of people are preemptively judging something without seeing the results.”

Maybe former NJPTA president Debbie Tyrrell is content to just “wait and see”, but many parents have already seen enough, particularly those parents who are also teachers and administrators. Sample tests are posted online, so what the test entails is no secret. T

Many parents do not want to give one more dime to the testing company, Pearson, until they know the results of the federal investigation into their business practices. They do not want their children to sit through a minimum of 9 hours and 45 minutes of a test as an experiment to see what happens. They do not want their children educated in the narrow confines of test preparation. They do not believe that a test with confusing and convoluted questions will provide any more enlightening information about the intelligence or ability of their children.

And let us be clear that they do not want the NJPTA to give them more of the same song and dance that they have heard all along.

WE Raise NJ…not the NJPTA, not the legislators, not the education commissioners, not the companies or their C.E.O’s, not even the president.

It’s time to listen to those who are the closest to the kids.

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